Posted in Nut Blog Series

  1. All About Peanuts -- Nut Blog Series

    The next feature in our nut blog series is not a nut at all, at least botanically speaking! It is a legume that goes by many names...the ground nut, earth nut, ground pea, goober, monkey nut but is most commonly known as...the peanut! 

    History and OriginAll Ferris peanuts are US-grown, though the species isn't native to the continental US. Originally, they hail from South America and made their journey to the states by taking the “scenic route.” Like many plants during the colonialism era, Spanish explorers brought the legume across the ocean and introduced the crop to Europe and Africa. Eventually peanuts made their way from Africa to North America during the Atlantic slave trade. Peanuts began in this country as a crop that was brought by slaves for slaves, but peanuts have since grown into one of... continue reading →

  2. Happy National Walnut Day! Nut Blog Series

    2058-Nut-Blog-Series-Walnuts-Header.png#asset:4814What’s up with walnuts?In honor of National Walnut Day, we are continuing our Nut Blog Series with walnuts! National Walnut Day was created in 1949 by the Walnut Marketing Board to encourage Americans to eat more walnuts. Walnuts are a very versatile nut and can be used in baking, cooking and plant-based milks!

    HistoryThe walnut tree has a rich history with people. Walnuts have been cultivated and consumed by humans for thousands of years, dating back to 7,000 BCE, and have been recognized for their health benefits since then. Today, three quarters of the global supply are produced in California.

    Though we call them “English” walnuts, in actuality they are native to Persia. Walnuts were traded along the silk road and eventually brought to the Americas by English merchant marines. Another varietal, the black walnut, developed differently in the... continue reading →

  3. A Cashew Story - Nut Blog Series

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    A Cashew StoryContinuing on with our Ferris Nut Blog Series, the next nut we are featuring is the cashew. The cashew, a favorite of many, has an exciting and rarely discussed story.

    HistoryThe cashew tree, native to the tropics of Brazil, is classified as a tropical evergreen tree. As a member of the Anacardiaceae family, the cashew’s closest relatives include the mango, poison ivy and sumac. The word cashew is derived from the Tupi word “acajou” which means “nut that produces itself”. This is most likely in reference to the fact that the cashew shaped fruit dangles below the fleshy, squash-shaped stem of the fruit (called the cashew apple). We think it looks like something Dr. Seuss would have illustrated! In the late 1500s, Portuguese colonists brought the cashew tree from Brazil to West Africa and then to India... continue reading →

  4. All About Almonds - Nut Blog Series

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    Today is National Almond Day, and to celebrate we’re kicking off a new Nut Blog Series! With each post, we’ll highlight a different nut, share a little history and background information, and talk about the health benefits that they offer. We’re also working on some really great recipes to share with you all down the road! Before we get too ahead of ourselves, we’ll kick off this Nut Blog Series by honoring National Almond Day with a post all about almonds.

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    History

    Almonds have long been a staple in human diets. In fact, anthropologists have discovered that they were served to the Egyptian Pharaohs in the form of bread. Almonds were also referenced in the Old Testament of the Bible dozens of times as a metaphor of strength, beauty and sustenance. We still incorporate almonds in our... continue reading →